Kalandra Wheeler
Texas Employment Lawyer Kalandra Wheeler

It’s that time of year again! As we roll into the holiday season, workplaces are gearing up for festive celebrations, including customary work holiday parties. These events are intended to foster camaraderie and team spirit. However, it is crucial to be reminded of the potential risks they pose, particularly concerning

Colin Walsh
Texas Employer Lawyer Colin Walsh

On August 18, 2023, the Fifth Circuit issued an en banc opinion in Hamilton v. Dallas County, No. 21-10133 that overturned decades old judge-made law limiting actionable claims under Title VII.  Let’s take a look.

What is Hamilton about?  Hamilton involves how the Dallas County Sheriff’s office schedules time

Jairo Castellanos
Austin Employment Lawyer Jairo Castellanos

Section 1981 and Title VII are both federal laws in the United States that address workplace discrimination. While they share some similarities, there are notable differences between the two laws in terms of their scope, coverage, and legal requirements. Understanding these distinctions is essential for individuals who may be facing

Kalandra Wheeler
Texas Employment Lawyer Kalandra Wheeler

“I was told that my braids were unprofessional.”

“I was told to cut off my locs.”

“I was told that my hair doesn’t fit the ‘company culture.’”

Ladies and gentlemen, race-based hair discrimination is still alive and well in 2021, and Black employees are being told

Jairo Castellanos
Austin Employment Lawyer Jairo Castellanos

Most people are familiar with an employer’s duty under the Americans with Disabilities Act to provide a qualified worker with a reasonable accommodation so that they are able to perform the essential job functions of their position. Yet, not as many people are aware that Title

As a precursor to filing a lawsuit under the laws that the EEOC enforces such as Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and the Age Discrimination in Employment Act,  employees must first file a charge of discrimination with the EEOC. As it stands now, the vast majority of these charges are dismissed by the EEOC. But not because these charges lack merit. The dismissal is often necessitated by a lack of resources and investigators. Often times this leaves the EEOC unable to conduct a proper investigation into the thousands of charges that are filed each year with the federal agency.

At this moment, the EEOC is on the precipice of making two major changes to the process of how the federal agency is going to handle the dismissal of charges of discrimination. These changes will include a change in the procedures in which the dismissals are processed, and they will include a change in the dismissal language contained in the right to sue letters that the EEOC issues upon the dismissal of a charge of discrimination. I will attempt to briefly outline some of the dangers and benefits of these changesContinue Reading EEOC Contemplates Much Needed Changes for Charge Dismissals